Easy Tips for Write Job Resignation Letter

If you’re quitting your job, don’t walk out the door without submitting a formal letter of resignation to your supervisor.

A resignation letter may seem like a chore, but many employers require it as part of the exit process as proof that you are voluntarily terminating your employment. Even if your boss or HR manager doesn’t ask for one, it’s still good practice to submit one anyway. In an article on The Balance, Alison Doyle, founder and CEO of CareerToolBelt, noted that your letter can help you maintain a positive relationship with your old employer, while also paving the way for you to move forward.

It’s important to note that resignation letters are not rants on why you’re leaving your job or why you’re unhappy with it.

“Regardless of your work experience, good or bad, it’s not advisable to use a resignation letter to burn bridges with previous employees,” Liz Torres wrote for Monster.com. “You never know who you could work with in the future or what connections your current employer has in your industry.”

Unless your employment contract states otherwise, Doyle advised turning in your signed formal letter as a follow-up to an in-person resignation, ideally at least two weeks before your intended departure. Here’s what career experts have to say about the dos and don’ts of writing a resignation letter.

Resignation letters should be fairly simple and straightforward. Vicki Salemi, a career expert for Monster, said the four basic pieces of information that must be present are:

  1. The date you’re submitting the letter (usually included in the heading)
  2. A formal statement of resignation
  3. Your proposed end date
  4. Your signature

Beyond the basics, it’s a good idea to express gratitude in your letter. Even if you had your differences, thank your supervisor for the opportunity to work for the company.

“Conjure up … the best time at your job, and have that image top-of-mind when you write your resignation letter,” added Alex Twersky, co-founder and vice president of Resume Deli. “Let your boss think they were great, even if they weren’t. [You might] get a good recommendation out of it.”

Twersky added that you should offer your assistance in training a replacement and preparing the team for your departure during your last two (or more) weeks.